Tire Storage Tips - Maxima Forums



Tires and Wheels Rubber, and lots of rubber in all kinds of sizes. What do you use when it's freezing? What do you use when it's hot? You want sticky rubbers? How about rubbers that will last a long time? Find your perfect rubber in here.
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Tire Storage Tips

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-01-2008, 06:00 PM   #1
Supporting Maxima.org Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (29)
 
KRRZ350's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Middleboro/Carver, Ma
Posts: 4,571
Tire Storage Tips

Found this interesting: Original Link

The storage of tires requires particular care. If tires are not stored properly, not only will there be
deterioration in their appearance, there may be a loss in performance and compound integrity.
CONSIDERATIONS / INSPECTIONS
• Tire treads and side walls are constructed from compounds that resist deterioration caused by
sunlight, ozone, and extreme temperatures. Nevertheless, stored tires should be protected against
these and other potentially damaging conditions. The longer the storage period, the greater exposure
there is to potential damage; so it is always advisable to use first the tires that have been in storage
the longest.
• Store tires in an area that is clean, cool, dark, and well ventilated, but with a minimum of circulating
air. Avoid areas that are wet, humid, oily, greasy, or in direct sunlight. Do not store in the same
area as an electric motor or other ozone generating source. If there is a question, check the ozone
level to be sure it does not exceed 0.08 ppm.
• Do not store tires directly on black asphalt or other heat-absorbent surfaces. Avoid storage adjacent
to highly reflective surfaces.
• As a rule, tires should be stored in an upright position to prevent distortion or disfiguration and to
make mounting work easier. If it is necessary to store tires in a horizontal position, be sure to stack
passenger car and light truck radial tires no higher than one meter (@ 3 feet), and radial truck tires
no higher than one and one-half meters ( 4 1/2 feet).
• When storing tires that have been inflated, deflate to fifty percent of the normal pressure. Keep
valve caps in place.
WHITEWALL/RAISED WHITE LETTER TIRES
Store unwrapped whitewall/raised white letter tires with white sidewalls facing each other to avoid
staining them through contact with the black rubber of the other tires.
PRIOR TO MOUNTING STORED TIRES
Tire interior should be inspected, to determine the air chamber is free of debris, dirt and moisture.
Dirt and debris can block the tire valve after mounting. Moisture can permeate the casing and
initiate oxidation (rust) of steel cords, which reduces tire strength and casing integrity.
TIRES INSTALLED ON VEHICLES
Storage area should be level, well drained. Care should be taken to avoid prolonged contact with
petroleum based substances: oils, fuels and asphalt.
Long term storage, or storage of seasonal vehicles; i.e. RV's, boat trailers and show cars requires special
preparations. Vehicles should be raised on blocks, so weight is removed from the tires.
TECHNICAL SERVICES BULLETIN Tire Storage Recommendations
11/21/2002
TIRE STORAGE RECOMMENDATIONS - Page 2
If blocking is not possible, tire pressure should be increased 25% from inflation required for the loaded
vehicle. Vehicles should be moved every three months to prevent flat spotting and ozone cracking at the
tire sidewall flex point. Flat spots usually disappear, when the tires warm-up, after a 25+ mile drive.
Flat spotting, which occurs on vehicles not moved for six, or more months may not disappear.
Tires on vehicles stored out-of-doors, should be protected by opaque covers to prevent damage from
sunlight.
PRIOR TO RETURNING VEHICLES TO SERVICE
Tire pressure needs to be adjusted to required inflation before the vehicle is returned to service.
REPLACEMENT OF TIRES ON FREQUENTLY STORED VEHICLES
Owners of RV's, boat trailers, show cars etc. should have their tires inspected by a qualified tire dealer,
if sidewall cracking and crazing occurs. Remaining tread wear is a poor gauge of tire serviceability on
these vehicles. Over time, the bonds between the rubber and reinforcing materials deteriorate,
regardless of remaining tread. Unserviceable tires should be scrapped, by cutting beads, or cutting
through sidewalls, to prevent re-use by unsuspecting persons.
KRRZ350 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 10:03 PM   #2
Conecarver
iTrader: (19)
 
BEJAY1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: NW Chicago burbs
Posts: 3,835
Disagree with storage directon. Horizontal is preferred per TireRack, Hoosier, and others. Much more deformation when standing them vertically unmounted.

Not mentioned too is never use tire dressings/shine as they'll dry out the sidewalls faster.

I found 55 gal heavy black contractor bags work best combined with vacuum sealing.
BEJAY1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 03:35 AM   #3
Offset Is Everything.
iTrader: (23)
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 9,426
Quote:
Originally Posted by BEJAY1 View Post
Disagree with storage directon. Horizontal is preferred per TireRack, Hoosier, and others. Much more deformation when standing them vertically unmounted.

Not mentioned too is never use tire dressings/shine as they'll dry out the sidewalls faster.

I found 55 gal heavy black contractor bags work best combined with vacuum sealing.
+1 on horizontally stored. not vertically.
MrDicks95SE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2008, 04:45 AM   #4
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4
Great post. I store my car about 50 % of the year splitting the miles up between it and another vehicle. Long story short, I had to replace the tires (only 10k miles on them) last month because they wouldn't balance up. The tire shop said they were defective and had severe hop. They even road force balanced them and the ride was terrible. Noise, vibration, etc.

I remember the ride quality being in the toilet when got it out of storage after sitting for 5-6 months. I believe I had definite flat spots on the tires that stayed for about 30 highway miles.

My question for the group: what are the cheapest option for wheels for the expressed purpose of long-term storage? I would gladly buy bald tires from a tire shop because I literally wouldn't drive on them more than 10 feet to park it in the garage for storage.
graysky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2009, 07:22 AM   #5
Senior Member
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1,493
Good info. But from my experience I've found it best to store them mounted on rims and inflated to 5 to 10 psi above the recommended pressure. I also use a tire holder that keeps them off the ground and not touching or rubbing against each other. Using my holder I can store them for a much longer period with no ill effects.
Maxgig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 06:04 AM   #6
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2
For high-speed, fully loaded or dual-riding touring motorcycle applications, inflate front tires to maximum recommended by vehicle manufacturer for Dunlop fitment and rear tires to maximum load inflation pressure on sidewall. Rear touring tires must be inflated to a minimum of 36 psi for light to medium loads and 40 psi for dual riding and other loads. Never exceed maximum load indicated on tire sidewall or vehicle capacity load found in owner's manual.
Eileifr Arvel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 07:27 AM   #7
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1
The best place to store tires is in a cool, dry location.You can lay them down flat, stacked on top of each other no taller than 4 high.This offers the most support and should eliminate any fitting problems the following use.Wrap each tire individually and stack them.Stored tires should be kept away from electric motors or welders as these produce ozone which will damage the rubber over time.
Haroldfern is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 09:09 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Springfield Twp, Ohio
Posts: 88
Im laying mine down flat in a cool place, been doing it for a few years now without trouble.
tiresmokinV8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2010, 10:27 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Roaming Shores, Ohio
Posts: 16
I keep mine in my basement, I go to tire places and ask if I can have tire covers like the ones you see out side that have a brand name on them. So I dont get the carpet dirty and such.
mustanghater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 03:50 AM   #10
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2
Front and Rear Tire Matching

Remember, correct matching of front and rear tires is important to obtain optimum performance and handling. Follow the Tire Selection guidelines.
  • Mount only tires marked “front wheel” on front positions and only tires marked “rear wheel” on rear positions.
  • A new front tire with a worn rear tire can cause instability.
  • Mixing radials, or mixing radials with bias or belted bias tires may adversely affect handling and stability. Always fit Dunlop Sportmax, Sportmax II D204, Sportmax touring D205 and Dunlop D207 high-performance radials in pairs. It should be noted that many factors other than tire incompatibility can affect the handling of a motorcycle, including the weight and height of the rider, mixing worn with unworn tires, and the fitment of luggage or fairings. Consult the motorcycle manufacturer before making modifications from stock.
  • Follow pressure recommendations shown on the Dunlop Motorcycle Tire Application Guide. Contact Dunlop if year and model are not shown on the current guide and the owner's manual does not list pressure settings for Dunlop tires.

    Keep in mind that hard cornering, passengers, heavy loads and sustained high speeds will require higher pressures (up to that indicated on the sidewall).

    CHECKING TIRE PRESSURES IS THE MOST IMPORTANT TIRE MAINTENANCE FUNCTION YOU CAN PERFORM.

    For high-speed, fully loaded or dual-riding touring motorcycle applications, inflate front tires to maximum recommended by vehicle manufacturer for Dunlop fitment and rear tires to maximum load inflation pressure on sidewall. Rear touring tires must be inflated to a minimum of 36 psi for light to medium loads and 40 psi for dual riding and other loads. Never exceed maximum load indicated on tire sidewall or vehicle capacity load found in owner's manual.

    Underinflated tires can result in imprecise cornering, higher running temperatures, irregular tread wear at the edge of the contact patch, fatigue cracking, overstressing and eventual failure of the tire carcass.

    Overinflating tires does not increase load carrying capacity, but will result in a hard ride and accelerated tire wear in the center of the contact patch.

    Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good quality gauge that holds a reading, and always before extended trips.

    Loss of pressure may occur due to worn out or badly seated valve cores. Check valve cores. If necessary, tighten for correct seating, or remove and replace them. A metal or hard plastic valve cap with an inner gasket should be used and installed finger tight to protect the valve core from dust, moisture and to help maintain a positive air seal.

    Repeated loss of inflation pressure may result from undetected tire damage. Visually inspect tires for punctures, cuts, abrasions, cracks, bulges, blisters or knots. It will be necessary to dismount the tire to complete an inspection for internal damage and any need for repair. See the Tire Repair section. Only certain punctures in the tread area may be repaired, and only if no other damage is present.

    Tires with non-repairable damage must not be used again. Damage caused by impacts, penetrations or continued underinflated/overloaded use is progressive and can result in sudden and complete tire failure and accident.

    Always seek expert inspection of the dismounted tire following curb, chuckhole or other impacts, evidence of penetration beyond the tire surface, bulges or low pressure. Do not continue riding on such tires.

    Inspect your tires frequently for damage and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occurs during operation of the motorcycle.
Harper Zavier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 08:05 PM   #11
Member
iTrader: (8)
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Dallas Texas
Posts: 36
tire storage

OK, some of these posts are from fellow southerners. Do you rent air conditioned storage? Here a "cool" interior space is my garage at 120+ during summer days.
sjohnso2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 03:12 AM   #12
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5
Tire Storage Tips

A flat tire (British English: flat tyre) is a deflated pneumatic tire. This may cause the rim of the wheel to ride on the tire tread or the ground, and may result in loss of control of the vehicle or irreparable damage to the tire and wheel.The most common cause is puncturing of the tire by a sharp object, such as a nail, thereby letting air out. Depending on the size of the hole, the tire may deflate slowly or rapidly
Nikole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2011, 12:54 AM   #13
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2
Tires also require particular care and they should be stored in cool, dark and dry room. The sunlight or any kind of artificial light should not directly fall on them, and also the storage room should not be wet or humid. The tire storage room should be well-ventilated, but with minimum circulation of air. Also, the tires cannot be stored in rooms where they come in contact with harmful solvents, oil or grease.
Vettori is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2011, 05:55 AM   #14
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 18
The life of tires are totally depend upon the condition that how you keep your vehicle tires, basically we need to follow these tips of storing tires in a dry locations for long lasting.
streakheath56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2011, 01:29 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: WEST DEPTFORD NJ
Posts: 24
VACCUUM SEALING

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr****s95SE View Post
+1 on horizontally stored. not vertically.
I SRORE MY TIRES IN 55 GALLON BAGS BUT CAN U HRLP ME WITH SOME INFO ON A SEALER TAHT WILL SEAL A BAG THAT BIG
THANK YOU
PLEASE EMAIL WE AT
[email protected]
THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME
FRANK
AKA BIG6988
856-693-1166
BIG6988 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2011, 06:21 AM   #16
Conecarver
iTrader: (19)
 
BEJAY1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: NW Chicago burbs
Posts: 3,835
Don't try to make an airtight vacumn seal. Even a pinhole will allow air to exchange. I tape/zip tie my 55gal contractor bags since it's easy. I also double bag since it's so cheap.
Do not stack them 10 high w/o bags like I used to do!
BEJAY1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 03:09 AM   #17
Newbie - Just Registered
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3
Thanks for the guidelines. I would like to add a few things about storing winter tires.
After the use of winter tires or when the winter weather is gone, you should store these tires in a cool and dry place. A garage would a better storage location. Place the tires flat on the ground and on one over other. When you buy the tires, get a storage bag to store the tires since the some elements present in air would cause cracks and rot on the tires. Cover each tire with the bags and stack them from electric motors since they may release ozone which would damage the rubber.
kylaarmstrong is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NY G35s Rims And tires coolsun Wheels/Tires 6 11-13-2016 06:01 PM
Suspension replacement JakeOfAllTrades 7th Generation Maxima (2009-2015) 6 10-05-2015 11:40 AM
Rear bagged coilovers Garrettz459 5th Generation Maxima (2000-2003) 1 09-28-2015 03:50 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:21 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.